Falls Canyon

Falls Canyon Hike

This short hike begins a Trabuco Creek Road about 3 miles east of Trabuco Canyon Road. After heavy spring rains, this hike may be impossible since it requires hiking across Trabuco Creek which can become impassible. This is one of the better waterfalls in the Santa Ana Mountains accessible by a short hike (about 1/2 mile).


From Trabuco Canyon Road, turn onto Trabuco Creek Road. A high-clearance vehicle is recommended, but I have seen Toyota Corollas make it on this road. Park at any turnout near GPS coordinate 33' 40.423N 117' 32.086W. The closest is at a wide ar ea to the south side of the creek road with parking on the incline of the hillside. There is room for several vehicles. Take one of the many fisherman trails the short distance north toward Trabuco Creek.You will need to cross the creek which should be relatively easy in all but the rainiest part of the season. If there are flooding conditions, you aren't likely to have successfully made the drive to this point anyway.If you arrived from tFallshe previously referenced GPS location, you will see Falls Canyon perpendicular to the creek to your left as you arrive at Trabuco Creek. You will cross the Falls Canyon drainage several times before you reach the falls, and some minor scrambling may be required, but this is a relatively easy short hike. The waterfall is obviously best in the spring, and typically dry the other seasons except for El Nino years where it may flow into early summer. I recommend long pants on this trail unless you are immune to poison oak. There are sections of this trail where almost all of the green vegetation you see is poison oak.

The small pools along falls creek typically are less than 2 feet deep even during the spring.

Frog

Camouflaged California Treefrog
on rock at the falls.

(Please click the red rectangle to this full text and source)

The trail begins to the right of the sanctuary on Harding Truck Trail. After a .25 mile walk at a slight incline you reach a fork in the road. From here go left and you will soon reach the creek bed. Head to your right until you reach the creek. Now here is where the fun part begins.

By no means is this an easy hike so be prepared for a long and wet hike.

Head up creek for 3 1/2 hours… Yes that’s right 3 1/2 hours. On this adventure you will hike along the creek, in the creek and across the creek. Staying dry is not an option. You will see some of the best creek pools around! (Great for the summer months) The trail is very shaded and sprawling with plant life including the infamous Poison Oak, so be aware of your surroundings. Newts lizards frogs and snakes are also common along the trail so keep an eye out.

After several creek crossings the canyon begins to narrow and the boulders begin to appear. Continue on up creek for the waterfall is just around the way. (that’s what I kept telling myself)

After a long, challenging, wet hike you should now be embracing the sight of Harding Canyons hidden beauty. A beautiful 20-25 ft waterfall with a waist deep pool at its base.

Although very difficult it is still very doable. As always be prepared and use common sense.

About Alex G

I started hiking in January of 2011 and haven't been able to stop! I enjoy exploring new trails and revisiting my favorites. I hope you enjoy reading about my adventures. Happy Trails!

(Read more at: http://octrailhikers.com/2011/08/20/harding-canyon-waterfall/ ) ~~~Nancy Gurish

 

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Note:  Maybe the answer lies somewhere between herbs, iodine and minerals.  For my family, our foundation is in the liquid minerals.  The minerals support all other functions in the body.  Those balances should be corrected no matter what route of therapy you follow.  As with all medical solutions - do your homework, talk to another person.  See a professional - get all the information you can from the start.  Your Health And Tech Friend  P.S. God bless you and your family!

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"I'm hunting for a mysterious waterfall.

The last time I went waterfall hunting, I mountain-biked along Black Star Canyon Road for several miles. Then I hiked through poison oak, scrambled over boulders and sloshed through a stream.

Article Tab: left-falls-smart-looking
I'm looking up at Canyon Falls, the top some 40 feet above. As dumb as I am, I was smart enough to skip testing the slippery orange rope left by inconsiderate and inexperienced hikers.
BY DAVID WHITING, ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER
ADVERTISEMENT

Was it worth it?

You bet.

Black Star's waterfall cascaded down 50 feet, freefalling into a split in the rocks. Water flowed out of a cave while the main falls splashed into a glistening pool.

This time, I'm in Trabuco Canyon and searching for a waterfall some claim is even better than Black Star and certainly far more spectacular than Trabuco Canyon's popular Holy Jim Falls...."  .. see this below ...

Santiago Peak

Santiago Peak

Page Type: Mountain/Rock

Location: California, United States, North America

Lat/Lon: 33.71060°N / 117.5333°W

Elevation: 5687 ft / 1733 m

Page By: Scott M.

Created/Edited: Feb 10, 2003 / Aug 14, 2011

Object ID: 151474

Hits: 69959

Page Score: 88.85% - 31 Votes

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Overview

Santiago is the highpoint of Orange County in Southern California. It lies along the crest of the Santa Ana Mountains, a coastal chain located southeast of the greater Los Angeles area. It is often referred to as Saddleback which refers to the skyline profile formed between it and nearby Modjeska Peak. There are various fire roads that approach the peak from all directions, and some more inviting trails that make it nearly to the summit as well. The Holy Jim Trail is probably the most scenic route to the top. The terrain is mostly chaparral, typical of the southern California mountain landscape, with stands of oaks and sycamores found in the deeper canyons with seasonal water flow.

The top of the peak is crowned with one of the densest arrays of telecommunications equipment found anywhere in the state - there is no single location for sweeping 360 views. By walking around the various installations in about a quarter mile radius, one can see views in all directions covering five counties and a large portion of the southern California area - from Catalina and San Clemente Islands out in the Pacific Ocean, south to Mt. Palomar, east to San Jacinto Peak and the desert environ, north to the San Bernadino Mountains and San Gorgonio, and of course the ever-popular hundreds upon hundreds of square miles of urban sprawl all around.

USGS 7.5 series topo - Santiago Peak.

Getting There

See each route for specific directions to trailheads. Thomas Guide references listed by page and grid for the west side approaches in Orange County are as follows:

Holy Jim Trail - TG page 864, grid A4. The turnoff from Trabuco Canyon Rd. (S19) to Trabuco Creek Rd., which is easily missed, is TG page 863, grid B7. Note: Trabuco Creek Rd. is a rough dirt road and high ground clearance is recommended. There are several stream crossing along the way so exercise caution after rains. 4WD is not normally required. A passenger car can make the trip in dry weather at a slow pace.

Maple Springs - TG page 802, grid B2 (Riverside 1/2 of page).

Harding Truck Trail - TG page 832, grid G7.

Red Tape

An Adventure Pass is required to park for all trailheads except the Harding Truck Trail route. The pass ($5.00/day or $30.00/annual) is available at stores near the trailheads and various outdoor shops such as Adventure 16 and REI.

According to Dave Rhodes there is now a self-issue Adventure Pass station located near the parking area at the start of the Holy Jim Trail. It is a rust colored pipe. Simply include $5.00 payment with the information listed on the envelope and drop into the "box". Be sure to remove the detachable form from the envelope and place it in plain view in your car with pertinent information listed.

And now (2/18/2008) Alex McConahay reports the box to pay for a one day pass at the trailhead is gone. Better pick one up ahead of time or buy the annual pass.

When To Climb

This peak can be climbed year round with the proper planning. Since the routes are long and mostly without water most people will enjoy these trips on cooler days. Temperatures can vary from freezing to 90 degrees F depending on the time of year. Snow falls on the peak once or twice annually. The Holy Jim route provides the most shade. Early starts are recommended during hotter seasons. The Maple Springs route is closed for species protection during part of the year. Contact the Cleveland National Forest offices for current closures. Two annual events may have a minor impact on your trip. The Saddleback Marathon uses the Holy Jim Trail as part of the course in mid November. The Vision Quest Mountain Bike event takes place in the spring. This event is put on by the Warrior's Society and uses parts of the Main Divide Truck Trail, Holy Jim Trail, and Maple Springs Truck Trail.

Camping

The nearest camping, in an organized campground, is at O'Neill Regional Park in Trabuco Canyon adjacent to the turn off for the Holy Jim trailhead. O'Neill is operated by the County of Orange and has sites for tents and RVs in an inviting oak woodland setting. Just so potential users know, camping at O'Neill is $15/night, plus a one-time (i.e. just for the first night, if you're staying multiple nights) $12 "processing" fee.

Etymology

Thanks to Bob Burd for submitting this.
"The name of St. James the Apostle was frequently used in Spanish times for place names (Santiago from Latin Sanctus Jacobus); but except for the names in Orange Co., it seems to have survived only in Santiago Creek [Kern Co.]. Point Bonita appears as Punta de Santiago on Ayala's map (1775); and Poso Creek [Kern Co.] was named Rio de Santiago by Garces in 1776. Creek, Hills, Peak, and Reservoir [Orange Co.]: The creek was named by the Portola expedition on July 27, 1769, two days after the feast day of St. James (Crespi, p. 140). Arroyo de Santiago is mentioned in a petition for a grant, Dec. 8, 1801 (Bowman). Santiago de Santa Ana was the name of a land grant dated July 1, 1810; and the name Lomas de Santiago or Lomerias de Santiago was given to another grant on May 26, 1846. The mountain known locally as Old Saddleback was labeled Santiago Peak when the USGS mapped the Corona quadrangle in 1894."

- Erwin Gudde, California Place Names

Historical

William H. Brewer chronicled his party's activities during a survey of California's resources between 1860 and 1864 in a book called "Up and Down California". On 1/26/1861 he and Professor Josiah Whitney, of Mt. Whitney fame, climbed Santiago Peak from the north by starting up what is now know as Coldwater Canyon. They carried a barometer to measure the elevation and along the way the almost impenetrable chaparral shredded their clothing. After almost six hours of vigorous climbing they reached the summit.

"But the views more than repaid us for all we had endured. It was one of the grandest I ever saw. No less than ten or twelve thousand square miles were spread out in the field of vision; or, if we take the territory embraced within the extreme points - land and sea - more than twice that amount."

They placed the summit at 5,675 feet only 12 feet lower than what is accepted as correct today. On their way down they observed signs of what they believed to be grizzly bears. They gave the mountain the name of Mount Downey in honor of the then governor of the state of California. Obviously, the name did not persist.

It is reported that the first trail toward the top was built in 1890 by Andrew Joplin. A remnant of the Joplin Trail still exists connecting Old Camp at the end of the Santiago Truck Trail to the Main Divide Truck Trail. It is steep and sometimes overgrown but, paired with the two dirt roads, does provide another alternate route to the top.


Sharing the Trails

These routes are popular with hikers, runners, and mountain bikers. Several organized events for runners and mountain bike riders are staged during the year. In most cases these events should not impact your trip.

Motorized vehicles also have access to some of the road sections of these routes. Most drivers are polite. Stay aware if you are on these sections.

Most of the trail maintenance on these routes (especially the Holy Jim Trail) is performed by members of the Warrior's Society made up of local mountain bike enthusiasts.

Current Weather Conditions

Click this link to go to a forecast for Trabuco Canyon located near to the western access entry points of Santiago Peak.

External Links


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Disease Is Not Real - Video ~~~Nancy



HARDING CANYON WATERFALL

Tags

, ,

In March of 2011 our sense of adventure led us to Modjeska Canyon, Ca for an attempt to reach Harding Canyon Waterfall.

We geared up and headed towards the Santa Ana Mountains to reach the trailhead before sunrise. Parking for Harding Canyon Falls is located at the Tucker Wildlife Sanctuary Parking here is free but limited, so arrive early for a spot.



(continued below ... )

BY DAVID WHITING
COLUMNIST
THE ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER

I'm hunting for a mysterious waterfall.


The last time I went waterfall hunting, I mountain-biked along Black Star Canyon Road for several miles. Then I hiked through poison oak, scrambled over boulders and sloshed through a stream.

Article Tab: left-falls-smart-looking
I'm looking up at Canyon Falls, the top some 40 feet above. As dumb as I am, I was smart enough to skip testing the slippery orange rope left by inconsiderate and inexperienced hikers.
BY DAVID WHITING, ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER
ADVERTISEMENT



Was it worth it?

You bet.

Black Star's waterfall cascaded down 50 feet, freefalling into a split in the rocks. Water flowed out of a cave while the main falls splashed into a glistening pool.

This time, I'm in Trabuco Canyon and searching for a waterfall some claim is even better than Black Star and certainly far more spectacular than Trabuco Canyon's popular Holy Jim Falls.

Consider that Holy Jim Falls is about 18 feet high. The falls I'm looking for is more than double that.

But before the day is over, my "must explore" gene kicks in.

And that leads to trouble.


FINDING THE TRAILHEAD

After years of visiting Holy Jim Falls with friends and family, I had trouble believing there was another falls in Trabuco Canyon that was bigger and higher.

Surely, people would be flocking to it.

But the directions were always vague. My best information was that Canyon Falls was about half-way up Trabuco Creek Road, just off a widening in the road.

I drive the bumpy dirt road a fair amount. I've never noticed a break in the mountains that would allow a stream to turn into a waterfall.

Of course, I'm pretty focused on driving, always reminded of the time I tore off the plastic protection plate under my Subaru. I hate driving Trabuco Creek Road.

In recent months, I've run and biked the road. Since the county took over the first 2.4 miles and transformed a mess into a relatively smooth gravel road, the trip didn't seem so bad.

So Saturday afternoon, I climb into my Subaru and head off, determined to find the falls.

Jiggling along Trabuco Creek Road, my Subaru is happy – until the border with the Cleveland National Forest. From then on, it's first gear.

I look for the road widening, but there are several. Fortunately, none are near a split in the mountains, a split that would indicate a canyon and a stream for a waterfall.

After 3.4 miles – and much slo-mo navigation over rocks, dips and rises – I spot a break in the mountains followed by a huge widening in the road.

I walk about 40 yards down the road looking for a well-worn trail on the other side of the stream.

Spotting it, I slide down the short steep embankment, hop across the stream and head into my unknown.

PROMISE OF EXPLORATION

The trail is so worn, it's practically groomed. I hike on soft dirt, criss-cross the stream a few times, duck under a few branches and come across two hikers, Erica Hernandez, 19, of Mission Viejo, and Armando Garcia, 20, of Trabuco Canyon.

How much farther to the falls?

Garcia says about 10 minutes. I've only been hiking about 10 minutes. This is going to be easy.

But then Garcia mentions something about ropes on the right side of the canyon, ropes that lead high above the big falls I'm coming to.

My explorer gene wakes up and whispers, "Hey, now!"

After passing sparkling pools and water flowing over a series of boulders, I spot the falls through the trees.

The waterfall is magnificent, spilling some 40 feet over rock and landing in a pool surrounded by boulders.

The sun is still high enough to hit the very top of the falls. Droplets sparkle like rough-cut diamonds.

But some inconsiderate climber has left an orange climbing rope that mars the otherwise pristine scene.

I'm not stupid enough to try to climb a sheer rock wall on a slippery wet rope anchored to – what? I have no idea.

But my sometimes stupid explorer gene says in a Homer Simpson voice, "Let's try the near-vertical scramble on the right. There are ropes there, too!"

ROPES FOR DOPES

I gingerly place my trail running shoes on pretty solid rock bumps and cling to outcroppings above.

I spent a day last week brushing up my rock climbing skills in Joshua Tree. There, I was climbing 5.4 routes. Compared to that, this is relatively easy.

But, as with most areas of the Santa Ana Mountains, this rock is crazy loose. And the higher I go, the more severe the consequences. Still, I pass on using the series or ropes that someone's strung.

Soon, the canyon floor disappears. At times, I consider gripping a rope since they look solid. But I have no idea how long each one has been there, how much rain and sun has weakened them, and what they are anchored to.

Also, each rope begs the question: Would anyone leave perfectly good ropes, ropes that cost serious money, in the wilderness? Probably not.

But they might leave old ropes.

So, up I climb to see how the ropes are anchored. The most secure are attached to outcroppings of bushes with limbs about 1.5 inches thick.

Bushes as anchors? I try to avoid betting my 175-pound life on bushes.

Finally, I come across what I expected to find. A rope frayed from rubbing on an obstacle, in this case another branch.

Sure, the ropes are inviting. They seem to offer security. But I suspect that at some point they will offer something very different, something wrapped in a body bag.

I descend and come across a guy shooting photos.

Marcelo Reginato, a 36-year-old Rancho Santa Margarita resident and photography hobbyist, tells me he'll Photoshop out the orange rope that defaces the waterfall.

Hiking out, I come across a father and son. They ask how much farther.

I offer about five minutes. Then I turn and offer one more thing.

"Stay off the ropes."

FINAL THOUGHT

Should I have cut down the ropes? Perhaps, although lacking tools and time that wasn't possible.

Also, I don't know much about the ropes. If you know anything, please contact me.

Next Tuesday: I received many reader responses (thank you!) about by Earth Day trash column. I'll share some next week.

David Whiting's column also appears News One Wednesdays, Fridays, Sundays; dwhiting@ocregister.com.

 

(Please read more at: http://www.ocregister.com/articles/ropes-351715-falls-road.html) ~~~Nancy Gurish

  • East Entrance

    .

"...The trail begins to the right of the sanctuary on Harding Truck Trail. After a .25 mile walk at a slight incline you reach a fork in the road. From here go left and you will soon reach the creek bed. Head to your right until you reach the creek. Now here is where the fun part begins...." ... see this below ...

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Raising awareness and funds for charitable organizations that empower San Diego's disadvantaged and homeless youth to make better choices. This is accomplished through public speaking, music, photography, and other fundraising events.

"...This short hike begins a Trabuco Creek Road about 3 miles east of Trabuco Canyon Road. After heavy spring rains, this hike may be impossible since it requires hiking across Trabuco Creek which can become impassible. This is one of the better waterfalls in the Santa Ana Mountains accessible by a short hike (about 1/2 mile).  ... "

 see this text below...

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This really irks me. For 2,200 years until 1805, medicine was practised exclusively according to the ancient..."  ... to this page ...

 

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